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Tech ObserverNewsPolicyFacebook's future in OZ bleak as Australia rolls law for defamation on online platforms

Facebook’s future in OZ bleak as Australia rolls law for defamation on online platforms

Any move by Facebook to quit Australia over new laws may puncture all claims of making the online world safe, warns Australian  PM Scott Morrison

Any move by Facebook to quit Australia over new laws may puncture all claims of making the online world safe, warns Australian  PM Scott Morrison

With the growing difference over new business mechanisms adopted by the global tech major Inc, the Australian  Prime Minister Scott Morrison said that Facebook Inc will show it has no interest in making the online world safe if it quits over laws holding it liable for defamation on its platform.

In the latest of several attempts to hold global internet companies to greater account for content on their platforms, Australia plans to make them share the identities of people with anonymous accounts if another person accuses them of defamation.

If the social media company fails to give that information, it must assume legal liability. The proposed law would also make social media operators legally responsible for defamatory comments beneath publishers’ posts on their platforms.

While replying to a question if he was worried that Facebook might quit Australia over the new law, PM Morrison said doing that “would be an admission that they have no interest in making the online world safe.”

It was not free speech “to hide in your basement as a masked troll and abuse and harass and stalk people,” Morrison said adding, “If you want to say something, then you should say who you are, and if the social media company lets you do that with a mask on, then we’ll hold them to account.”

Facebook, which has renamed its parent entity , has previously said it could not reasonably be expected to monitor all comments on its website for defamation, and that it often has less access to users’ pages than the users themselves.

Twitter has said it routinely cooperates with legal requests for user identities, but that it values the importance of protecting whistleblowers. In February, global social media companies threatened to quit Australia over laws making them pay media outlets for the content appearing on their websites.

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