Public Clouds are by default secure is a myth, says Ovum Research

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A latest report from in partnership with secybersecurity firm Palo Alto Naetworks said that the assumption that public clouds are by default secure is away from reality.

According to findings of the reports, organisations need to recognise that cloud security is a shared responsibility. While cloud providers are responsible for the security of their infrastructure, the onus is on companies themselves to secure their data and applications stored in that infrastructure.

According to report, 72 per cent of security decision-makers in large enterprises in India believe that security provided by cloud providers is sufficient to protect them from cloud-based threats.

Among the companies surveyed in India, nearly half of them (47%) operate with more than 10 security tools within their infrastructure to secure their cloud. Report stressed that having numerous security tools creates a fragmented security posture, adding further complexity to managing security in the cloud, especially if the companies are operating in a multi-cloud environment.

The multi-cloud approach creates a dangerous lack of visibility that is prevalent in 50 percent of large organisations surveyed, according to Andrew Milroy, head of advisory services, Asia-Pacific, Ovum.

“The ubiquity of multi-cloud deployments in large organisations calls for a unified view of all cloud-native services. It is ideal for organisations to have a central console that uses technologies such as to help prevent known and unknown malware threats, and quickly remediate accidental data exposure when it arises,” said Milroy.

The report said that the need for automation is further underscored by the study, which revealed that large enterprises do not have enough time and resources to dedicate to cloud security audits and training.

According to reorit, 63 per cent of Indian organisations have either never conducted a security audit or do not do it on a yearly basis. Furthermore, 19 per cent of these audits do not even include cloud assets and 57 per cent of organisations conduct internal audits only. Besides audits, there is also inadequate cloud security training for both IT and non-IT staff.

About 55 per cent of organisations do not provide training to IT security employees on a yearly basis. It is, therefore, not surprising that staff outside of IT departments receive even less training – 71 pe rcent of Indian non-IT professionals do not receive training on a yearly basis.

The report said that despite organisations’ inability to provide more frequent audits and security training for IT teams and employees, 46 per cent of the organisations surveyed use threat intelligence and analytics to identify new threats and take necessary action. Some 20 percent of the organisations have also equipped themselves with real-time threat monitoring capabilities.

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