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HomeNewsPolicyAmid growing tensions with top tech majors, Australia looks to slap new legislation to rein in tech giants

Amid growing tensions with top tech majors, Australia looks to slap new legislation to rein in tech giants

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Australia has led global efforts to reign in the powers of the likes of Google and Facebook, installing legislation that has been heralded as a model for others to copy.

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Amid growing tensions over the role of global tech majors including Google regarding its operations in the country, the Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison is likely to announce a new set of parliamentary inquiries into the behavior of the world's largest technology companies and the need for new legislation.

has led global efforts to reign in the powers of the likes of Google and Facebook, installing legislation that has been heralded as a model for others to copy.

Raising the possibility of additional regulation, Morrison is likely to speak on Wednesday that the new inquiry will have a wide scope, but will include asking the committee lawmakers to investigate the algorithms used by social media platforms, how the companies verify identification and age and the extent to which restrictions on these are being enforced.

has big questions to answer,” Morrison will say, according to extracts of his planned announcement. “Big tech created these platforms, they have a responsibility to ensure they're safe.”

The announcement of a new inquiry is likely to stoke tensions between Australia's government and Facebook, which recently changed its name to Meta, and Google.

Earlier this year Australia implemented tough new legislation that made both tech companies pay local media for content, while Canberra has proposed laws that would force them to share the identities of people with anonymous accounts if another person accuses them of defamation.

When Australia proposed legislation forcing both companies to pay local media for news content, Google threatened to close its Australian search engine, while Facebook cut all third-party content from Australian accounts for more than a week.

Both eventually struck deals with Australian media companies after a series of amendments to the legislation were offered. The committee in charge of the new inquiry will report back its findings by February 15, 2022.

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Tech Observer Desk at TechObserver.in is a team of technology reporters led by a senior editor who brings latest updates and developments from the world of technology.
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